Tag Archives: Inspiration

ON DESIGN: WILLIAM MORRIS + ARTS AND CRAFTS

ALABAMA CHANIN – ON DESIGN: WILLIAM MORRIS + ARTS AND CRAFTS

Last fall, as an extension of our Makeshift initiative, we began a new series of events and conversations called On Design. The series explores art, design, makers, relationships, and the elevation of craft. Our conversation in January explored William Morris and the Arts and Crafts Movement. Here are some of Natalie’s thoughts from the presentation. Feel free to share your own thoughts and join the conversation.

From Natalie:

When I started the company that Alabama Chanin has become today, I had a vision for what I wanted to accomplish. At the time, I wouldn’t have identified that vision as a business model—but as the company expanded, I understood that I wanted to design and grow the business in a sustainable way. In a world of fast fashion, mass production, and machines, I wanted to design slowly and thoughtfully. I also wanted to promote skills that seemed to be vanishing, particularly hand-sewing skills—like those used by quilters.

ALABAMA CHANIN – ON DESIGN: WILLIAM MORRIS + ARTS AND CRAFTS

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INSPIRATION: ONE-OF-A-KIND INDIGO

ALABAMA CHANIN – ONE OF A KIND

Indigo – electric, deep, light, or tropical

Indigo can be bright, violet-blue, midnight blue.

Electric indigo represents the sixth chakra—the Anja—that includes the third eye.

It is the color of intuition and self-awareness.

Today, the New Leaves stencil + layers of indigo of the Indigo Shell Top made me think of this:

A creation of Miya Ando: a representation of the bioluminescent bays of Puerto Rico.

Phosphorescent leaves floating on a pond, lighting up the night with a dreamy, radiant blue glow.

More one-of-a-kind Indigo pieces have been added to our current Collection.

 

KRISTINE VEJAR: ALABAMA STUDIO SEWING PATTERNS

ALABAMA CHANIN – KRISTINE VEJAR: ALABAMA STUDIO SEWING PATTERNS

As we continue to get feedback from some of our favorite makers on Alabama Studio Sewing Patterns, we realize how lucky we are to be part of such a positive DIY community. So many fellow writers, designers, knitters, and Journal followers have contacted us with generous responses and honest commentary. How heartening it is to find ourselves in the middle of a group of makers who choose to lift one another up.

That being said, we received a lovely review from Kristine Vejar, founder of A Verb for Keeping Warm. You may remember that we spoke with Kristine in the past, specifically about the Seam Allowance Project, a clever and beautiful approach to sustainability. (Read more on the project here.) In her review she points out something many readers have also noted: Alabama Studio Sewing Patterns is not necessarily written for beginning sewers. It was written for those who want to learn more about patterns and customization. Manipulating patterns is something that most of us graduate to rather than begin doing (though it’s not impossible).

When considering customizations for a her garment, Kristine took into account both practical and stylish considerations. First, she likes to keep things simple, without toting lots of bags here and there. The solution was easy enough: add pockets (see Alabama Studio Sewing Patterns, pages 28-29 for detailed instructions and photos). Secondly, the breezy San Francisco weather leaves her reaching for long sleeved garments. Another easy solution: add sleeves to her chosen A-Line Dress (see pages 121-123 for instructions).

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AMY BUTLER: ALABAMA STUDIO SEWING PATTERNS

ALABAMA CHANIN – AMY BUTLER: ALABAMA STUDIO SEWING PATTERNS

This week, we feature another in our series of posts from makers we admire highlighting Alabama Chanin garments—specially tailored for the wearer, using techniques outlined in Alabama Studio Sewing Patterns. Previous posts from Amy Herzog and Heather Ross reveal what we really already know: we are not defined by our garment fit issues and owning something that truly fits your own body can enhance your confidence.

Today we are delighted to post kind words from Amy Butler. Amy is a designer whose fabric prints are instantly identifiable; her sewing patterns (we love her unique bags) are exciting and feel fresh. Over the years, Amy has created a signature line of home goods that include lush looking rugs, covetable wallpaper, and lovely wall art and stationery. Make time to browse her website—I guarantee you will end up with a wish list a mile long.

In the past, Amy has had varying degrees of success finding the right garment length, so we tailored our Classic Coat pattern to fall at exactly the right place for her height. View Chapter 2: Fit + Customization, pages 112-115 in Alabama Studio Sewing Patterns for more suggestions on how to best alter your garment’s length to your own measurements.

ALABAMA CHANIN – AMY BUTLER: ALABAMA STUDIO SEWING PATTERNS

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NEW: ONE OF A KIND

NEW-ONE-OF-A-KIND

In April, I traveled to Chicago to lecture at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. While there, I spent some time at the Art Institute and found great inspiration from the works displayed in their galleries. (For someone who has been considering scale and texture quite a bit lately, Elena Manferdini’s exhibition gave me plenty to think about.)

I immediately felt connected to one of the Georgia O’Keeffe paintings, which took me back to 2012 when Alabama Chanin hosted a Weekend Away Workshop in Taos, New Mexico. The workshop was held at the Mabel Dodge Luhan House, and I slept in the very room that Georgia O’ Keeffe stayed in some 60 years ago.

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NEW: INDIGO

NEW-INDIGOWith the addition of our in-studio dye house, we continue to experiment with and expand our indigo offerings. Our indigo vats are producing colors richer and more beautiful than we ever imagined, and we have added custom, hand sewn garments and hand dyed, one-of-kind pieces to our existing collection.

Today we launch our newest explorations in indigo.

Fabric-Swatch---New-Leaves---Couched---Indigo---C28---20703---Abraham-Rowe-(2)

P.S.: Learn to indigo dye here and find our favorite shoes in a shade of indigo here.

P.P.S: Visit our newly updated A. Chanin + Essentials section on AlabamaChanin.com to find our A. Chanin machine made line, Basic hand sewn garments (in new colors), and accessories.

#MEMADEMAY2015

ALABAMA CHANIN – #MEMADEMAY2015

If there’s something we have learned from our DIY community and The School of Making programming, it’s that our fellow makers can be passionate and prolific. In a world focused on “fast fashion” we are constantly inspired to see so many taking time and effort to create meaningful things.

Quite a few of you have participated in Me Made May over the course of the last month. For the uninitiated, Me Made May was dreamed up by Zoe Edwards, a blog writer who, for the past 5 years, issued a challenge for makers across the globe to wear clothing they have created, during the month of May. While not everyone can wear something handmade every day, many have taken up the challenge with gusto.

So for May’s Month of Instagram, we are posting some of your beautiful photos of Me Made May garments alongside Alabama Chanin’s photos. If you participated this year (and have not done so already), please post your photos to Instagram and Twitter using the #mmmay15 hashtag – and also #theschoolofmaking, if yours is an Alabama Chanin garment.

Photos courtesy of @catcounts, @differentmeasure, @ebbandsew, @goodyarmamona, @heyallday, @hisclementine, @kaygardiner, @krrbsale, @lauramaedesigns, @lavalark, @making.it, @mbmoore, @melaniefalick, @qoyah_yisrael, @reneeplains, @subloke, and @yarnonthehouse

P.S. Follow us on InstagramFacebookTwitter, and Pinterest.

P.P.S. Use our new hashtag #theschoolofmaking to share your latest Studio Style DIY project.

DESIGN: PATRICK KELLY

ALABAMA CHANIN – DESIGN: PATRICK KELLY

Last July, we explored Alabama’s fashion design history and, in our studio conversations about that post, we started asking one another about other designers that have emerged from the South. Dana Buchman, Pat Kerr, Johnny Talbot, and Wes Gordon all hail from states neighboring our own. When searching my brain for designers from Mississippi, the first that came to mind was Patrick Kelly.

Patrick stands out so significantly in my memory because he emerged as a designer of note in the 1980s and during my time in design school. He is, in many ways, a designer with sensibilities completely different from my own; he created body conscious garments with flamboyant embellishments. In other respects, we have a certain kinship, as he found ways to repurpose and recycle clothing into new garments. He also found inspiration in his community and neighbors, once telling People Magazine, “At the black Baptist church on Sunday, the ladies are just as fierce as the ladies at the Yves Saint Laurent haute couture shows.”

ALABAMA CHANIN – DESIGN: PATRICK KELLY

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DESIGN + SCALE

ALABAMA CHANIN – DESIGN + SCALE

I’ve been toying with the idea of scale and pattern recently. This thought arose because of a presentation I gave in March on Ettore Sottsass and the Memphis Group. The talk was part of the monthly On Design Lecture Series that we host in our studio as staff development but is also open to our community as part of The School of Making educational programming. (It’s on hiatus for the summer, but we’ll let you know as soon as we start back.) Many of our young in-house designers are fascinated by the 1980s and wanted to know more about the design influences that fueled this era. I went to design school from 1983 to 1987, so this concept of 1980s design seemed appropriate and very exciting to revisit.

While unearthing my thoughts on the 80s, I realized that the most prominent design trend in my memory was Ettore Sottsass and the Memphis group—the Italian design collective during the 80s who challenged the “established” rules of design. Their playful use of scale and pattern remain strong influences in design today (and my personal design aesthetic as well). While putting together the talk, I realized it had been such a long time since I played with scale. So, I pulled two gorgeous books on from my library: Ettore Sottsass Metaphors and Ettore Sottsass (which we also sell in the design section of our store as it is one of my all-time favorite books). Ettore Sottsass Metaphors sets the stage for playing with shapes in nature and Ettore Sottsass is incredibly inspiring for its illustration of scale, pattern, and color in design—aside from being one of the most beautiful books I own.

ALABAMA CHANIN – DESIGN + SCALE

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