Book Cover of Orwell's Roses by Rebecca Solnit

WHAT WE’RE READING

Read (or listen) along with us. #AlabamaChaninBookClub


Orwell’s Roses by Rebecca Solnit

Solnit offers an endearing portrait of George Orwell, the radical twentieth-century dystopian novelist who displays a capacity for hope through the act of planting and tending to his roses.


Finding Me, written and read by Viola Davis

Listen on Libro.fm and support your local bookstore.


Lost Woods: The Discovered Writing of Rachel Carson


Whereabouts by Jhumpa Lahiri

Listen to Whereabouts on Audible—read by Susan Vinciotti Bonito.


How to Tell a Story: The Essential Guide to Memorable Storytelling from The Moth by Meg Bowles, Catherine Burns, Jenifer Hixson, Sarah Austin Jenness, and Kate Tellers.

Congratulations to our friends at The Moth for their newest book landing on The New York Times Best Sellers list. 

Read our interview with Catherine Burns, our Alabama sister and Artistic Director of The Moth, here


Cassandra Speaks by Elizabeth Lesser: “When women are storytellers, the human story changes.”

Listen to Cassandra Speaks on Audible—read by the author.


The Women Who Revolutionized Fashion: 250 Years of Design by Madelief Hohé and the Peabody Essex Museum.

Congratulations to our friends at the Peabody Essex Museum on receiving the Richard Martin Exhibition Award from the Costume Society of America for this exhibition. Tour Made It: The Women who Revolutionized Fashion online here.

Image Grid of Book Covers and Spreads from Alabama Chanin's "What We're Reading" List
Clockwise: Spine of Orwell’s Roses by Rebecca Solnit; Cover of Lost Woods: The Discovered Writing of Rachel Carson; Orwell’s Roses, “Roses and Revolution” featuring the iconic Tina Modotti photograph “Roses, Mexico” (1924); Origins and development of Josef Albers’ iconic Homage to the Square series from Josef Albers: Interaction; “Our Ever-Changing Shore,” 1958 by Rachel Carson from Lost Woods: The Discovered Writing of Rachel Carson; The Moth StorySLAM poster (developed by The Moth as a resource to support storytellers preparing to share on the Moth StorySLAM stage) from How to Tell a Story: The Essential Guide to Memorable Storytelling from The Moth


And explore our favorite books for color inspiration:

On Color by David Scott Kastan and Stephen Farthing


Pantone: The 20th Century in Color by Leatrice Eiseman and Keith Recker


Josef Albers: Interaction, edited by Heinz Liesbrock and Ulrike Growe


Interaction of Color by Josef Albers


The Secret Lives of Color by Kassia St. Clair


An Atlas of Rare and Familiar Colour: The Harvard Art Museums’ Forbes Pigment Collection


Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours: Adapted to Zoology, Botany, Chemistry, Minerology, Anatomy, and the Arts by Patrick Syme

This is, famously, the book that Charles Darwin referenced to write about the colors that he saw in nature during his voyage sailing around the world from 1831–1836 aboard the H.M.S Beagle. Read more about “The Book that Colored Charles Darwin’s World” via The New Yorker.

Clockwise: Cover of An Atlas of Rare and Familiar Colour: The Harvard Art Museums’ Forbes Pigment Collection; Study IV-1 from Josef Albers’ Interaction of Color, chapter IV: “A color has many faces—the relativity of color”; Overview of the color Blue from The Secret Lives of Color by Kassia St. Clair; Introduction to the color Red from On Color; Cover of Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours: Adapted to Zoology, Botany, Chemistry, Minerology, Anatomy, and the Arts; Cover of Pantone: The 20th Century in Color in Pantone® Dark Blue C


P.S.: Embroidery: Threads and Stories from Alabama Chanin and The School of Making by Natalie Chanin arrives this fall. Pre-order a signed copy here.

Embroidery: Threads and Stories combines lessons in design and embroidery with Natalie’s engaging story of returning to her childhood home, the history of textiles in her region, and the evolution of Alabama Chanin and The School of Making. A deeply personal and reflective work, Natalie’s sixth book explores her design ethos, creative process, and the indelible impacts she has made in the textile industry and maker movement as a pioneer of sustainable design.

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